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How to extend NTFS system partition without rebooting computer?

Why need to extend NTFS system partition without rebooting?

I believe that almost everyone has ever encountered the low disk space warning created by Windows. That is all because your disk space has been used up. How to solve this problem, especially when it happens to your system partition? To extend system partition is certainly necessary, but there are so many methods to choose, which one is best? To extend your system partition without rebooting computer may be the most desirable solution, because the system expansion won't interrupt your previous work. Users of Windows Server 2000, 2003 and 2008 prefer to this solution because extending system partition without rebooting Server can ensure your business continuity.

How to extend NTFS system partition without rebooting computer?

Partition manager software - EaseUS Partition Master can extend NTFS system partition without rebooting computer under Windows 2000/XP/Vista/Windows 7/8 and Windows Server 2000/2003/2008 while the data is completely protected in the extending process. Both MBR and GPT disks are supported.

Steps to extend NTFS system partition without rebooting.

Step 1: Download EaseUS Partition Master and install it on your computer.

Tips: If there is not enough free space (100MB) to install EaseUS Partition Master on the system partition (C: drive), please change the installation directory to other partition while installing EaseUS Partition Master.

Step 2: Launch EaseUS Partition Master. There are two cases to extend NTFS system partition without rebooting.

  • Case 1: The system partition is next to another partition.
  • Case 2: There is unallocated space behind system partition.

Case 1 - If your system drive is next to another partition, please do as the following steps. (In this case, partition C: is system drive, partition D: is next to C: drive)

1. Right click the D: partition that you want to carve up free space for the C: drive on the disk map, and choose "Resize/Move partition".

Resize and Move partition

2. Position the mouse pointer on the left partition handle. Drag the handle to the partition size you want when the mouse pointer changes to a double-headed arrow.

Make unallocated space for system drive C:

Move unallocated space to the right side of system drive

3. Now you will get free space at the right side of system partition C.

Extend system partition

4. Position the mouse pointer on the right partition handle. Drag the handle to cover all free space until the handle can't move when the mouse pointer changes to a double-headed arrow.

Extend system partition

5. Choose "Apply".

Case 2 - If there is some unallocated space behind system partition, please do as the following steps to extend system partition. (In this case, partition C: is system drive.)

1. Select system partition, then right click system partition and choose "Resize/Move partition".

Resize and Move system partition

2. Extend system partition C: to a suitable size, and click OK.

Extend system drive

3. After extending system partition, you can preview it on disk map.

Preview resizing system partition results

4. If you are satisfied with the operation you make, you will see the operations you do in Pending Operations. Just click "Apply".

You can also resize other NTFS partitions excluding NTFS system partition without reboot. Before that you must ensure all applications in the partition are closed.

Tips:

1. If there is a step that needs to reboot system, there is a "!" before this step in "Pending Operations". If you don't want to reboot the system, please check and close all live application in the partition. Undo this step, and do it again.

Step that needs reboot

2. To extend FAT system partition, you will be required to reboot the system.

3. For Windows Server 2003, this feature is only available under Windows Server 2003 SP2. Please upgrade your Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2003 SP2.

4. By extending system partition here, it means you extend system partition without changing its initial position.

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